Posts in Philosophy of Life
Generational Hazing in the Workplace: What Millennials Can Do to Stop the Negative Feedback Loop

We all know millennials are our laziest workers. The speaker paused as the room filled with silence. You know it’s true—you work with them every day. Even you young people here can’t deny it. That’s why we need to create these opportunities, because the millennials are not going to seek them out by themselves.

I couldn’t believe what I heard. I asked myself: did that really just happen? A cultural stereotype was legitimized by a government employee at a state-sponsored event filled with local business leaders. That’s when I realized the missing piece in the whole workforce-education equation: we have multiple generations working together, each with their own unique background, behaviors, and beliefs.

We talk about bullying and hazing in schools, but rarely do we talk about how the older generation imposes the exact same behaviors on the younger generation, in plain sight.

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Thoughts and Reflections upon Reading My 1000th Book

Several years ago, a friend who studies Eastern philosophy shared a parable about a monk who, after their death, awoke in a room covered wall-to-wall, floor to ceiling, with books. The monk went to a corner, reached to the top shelf, grabbed the first book, and opened to the first page. The monk sat with the book and upon finishing the last page, they returned the book to its place and grabbed the next one on the shelf. The monk continued until they had read all the books in the room. Only then were they allowed to move on to their next life.

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Luck is(n’t) Everything

 We all encounter luck, both the good and the bad. Despite the many positive and negative events we all live through—seemingly at random—most people rarely recognize the luck they have or know how to capitalize on it. …there isn’t a way to get more good luck, but we can learn how to recognize lucky breaks and prepare for the times when it feels like everything around us is falling apart. Whether it’s good luck or bad, these strategies will help.

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What to Do When Your Expectations Do Not = Reality

Never EXPECT your version of reality to work out exactly as you planned. Instead, expect that you will need to revise your plans. Instead of spending your energy and willpower on things you can’t control (like the event that caused you to change your expectations), transfer that same energy to focus on how you are going to adapt your plan to the current (real) reality. 

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The Top 15 Lessons I Learned in My 20s

Lesson 1: Don’t Worry About What You Can’t Control
Lesson 2: There is Always a Solution

Lesson 3: Set One Goal for the Day

Lesson 4: Fail Often

Lesson 5: Read More and Read Diversely

Lesson 6: Spend Less

Lesson 7: Avoid Debt (Including Student Loan Debt)

Lesson 8: Never Pass Up an Opportunity to Learn Something New

Lesson 9: Go Out of the Classroom, Get Your Hands Dirty

Lesson 10: Stop Complaining
Lesson 11: Getting Drunk Isn’t Worth the Hangover

Lesson 12: Be Kind (even if you think someone doesn’t deserve it)

Lesson 13: Everything is a Gift

Lesson 14: Always Do Your Best

Lesson 15: Respect Others Because You Respect Yourself

**Bonus Lesson 16: Never Sacrifice Your Values** (W/ A SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT)

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What an Old Japanese Folktale Can Teach Us About Career Satisfaction

The Stonecutter is one of my favorite Japanese folktales. Its author and date of origin are unknown, and it is likely several hundred years old. And there’s a good reason why it’s still around: the message in the story can be applied to anyone at anytime in every career. … Instead of saying, I’ll be happier if... look at all the ways you can be happy in the position you are in now. At times, we are so focused on getting to the next step in our career, we miss the meaningful opportunities that are already waiting for us. There is a lot of power in a stonecutter, but sometimes you have to become a stone mountain to realize how important and powerful the stonecutter’s hammer and chisel are. 

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3 Reasons Most People Never Find their Perfect Career

According to the most recent Gallup State of the American Workplace report, 67% of U.S. employees are disengaged at work. Looking closer, 16% of employees are actively disengaged, meaning, they are miserable, and their efforts often result in the destruction of what their engaged coworkers are building. The other 51% are simply "not engaged" and are "just there". They are unattached to their work and workplace. They're doing their time, unenthusiastically, without energy or passion. This means that roughly two-thirds of Americans wake up every morning to spend most of their day doing something that isn’t meaningful or fulfilling.

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What's Holding You Back Is Inspiring Your Competition

Yesterday, someone told me about the New York Times Bestselling novel they have brewing inside them. The only problem is, they can’t start working on it until they have a vintage mahogany table to write it on. And a new laptop. And can afford to move to the perfect house in the country because the city is too loud for beautiful writing. 

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Finding Your Purpose in the Gig Economy

This month, we’ve looked at how your purpose, skills, and lifestyle connect in your perfect career. That’s great for some people, but what if you haven’t found “the one” yet? I get it, you’re waiting around to find a job that does it all for you. The good news is, we are living in a gig economy, meaning, you don’t need a traditional job anymore and you can find your perfect connection in multiple jobs.

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Why You Shouldn’t Follow Your Passion

We’ve heard it so many times, it’s become a cliché: follow your passion. Commencement speakers tell graduates it’s the golden rule for happiness and nearly every building I walk through, someone has the words thumb-tacked to a spongy cubical wall for inspiration. Since we’re all familiar with the expression, tell me, what is passion and why should you follow it?

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Quick Guide: How to Find Your Perfect Career (And Why So Many Are Doing it Wrong)

When you don’t know what you want to do, your search can take you an inch in a million directions instead of a mile in the one that matters. What you call “searching” is not progress; you’re treading water. You are exerting a lot of energy to keep your head above water, but you’re not getting any closer to shore. 

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How to Find Your Purpose (and how to stop wondering if you’ve found it yet)

Last week, I wrote about two big questions: what are you doing (your mission) and why are you doing it (your purpose). Too often, people confuse what they do with why they do it. When they finish a project or achieve their goal, they lose their motivation to find the next thing. These smart and creative people are left treading water, wishing they hadn’t solved the unsolvable problem, because then they still would have a defined, achievable goal.

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How Discovering Your Purpose in Your 20s Is the Secret to a Lifetime of Happiness

Unless life has other plans for you, one day, your hair will start changing color (or start falling out). Soft lines, called crow’s feet, will radiate outward from the corners of your eyes. Your bones will begin to shrink, and your muscles will go stiff. Welcome to your golden years.

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Six Ways to Find Clarity in Conflicting Information

The early bird gets the worm. Good advice, unless you’re the worm. And if you are the worm, you might be following very different advice: “haste makes waste” or “all good things come to those who wait.”

We have a lot of these sayings. Often, I find myself in situations where saying them sounds natural.

You should dress appropriately for the job you’re doing, after all, the clothes make the man. Then again, you can’t always judge a book by it’s cover.

Look at the world! The corruption! The poverty! No wonder, money is the root of all evil. Then again, you’ve got to have money to survive. After all, money makes the world go ‘round.

Working as a team, we will knock this out in no time. You know what they say: Many hands make light work. On second thought, let’s work on some of this individually and check back tomorrow morning. You know what they say: Too many cooks spoil the soup.

At first, I was a little skeptical about working together, but now I’m really happy we are. It’s true, opposites attract. Different day, different person: This project is coming along great, I’m happy we see eye to eye on so many things, birds of a feather flock together.

Scratching your head? Me too.

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Work/Life Balance Is Dead

At least, in the traditional way we think of it. What we think of as “work” has changed more in the last 50 years than ever before. Industry change, partnered with a shift in technology, has changed what we do and how we do it.

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